How do you go from that to that?!?!

Made a new big drawing called 'Gardens of the yesterdays'. the picture below is this drawing in a 'light' state.

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And this is what it became in the end.  I guess the guideline was; 'need more black!'

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By Any Means - New Finnish Sculpture, a book

What defines sculpture today, what will define it tomorrow? By Any Means presents the work of 20 young Finnish sculptors, all of whom have in their own way extended the concept of sculpture, including into areas that as yet are barely seen as fitting the definition.

In the interviews in this book the artists talk about how they solve problems related to their work. At the same time, they shed light on their own thinking, their sources of inspiration and their focuses of interest. Professor Jussi Pallasmaa’s essay profiles the life and art of Raimo Utriainen (1927–1994) – a major innovator in Finnish sculpture.

Artists: HC Berg (Hans-Christian Berg), Joakim Sederholm, Päivi Häkkinen, Vesa-Pekka Rannikko, Terhi Heino, Markus Kåhre, Hanna Vihriälä (Jaanisoo), Anssi Kasitonni, Petri Eskelinen, Tommi Toija, Antti Immonen, Oona Tikkaoja, IC-98 (Patrik Söderlund ja Visa Suonpää), Sari Palosaari, Emma Helle, Antti Oikarinen, Olli Keränen, Kalle Nio, Anna Rokka, Jenna Sutela.

Link to the book!

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Oh yeah, the bees...

I draw several drawings of bees (this one with one bumblebee also) last year and just suddenly realised they all have new home's now and I can't show them in a show anymore, which was my original plan. I guess it's a good thing, but yeah...well, I do have some bad photos of them.

I draw several drawings of bees (this one with one bumblebee also) last year and just suddenly realised they all have new home's now and I can't show them in a show anymore, which was my original plan. I guess it's a good thing, but yeah...well, I do have some bad photos of them.

Installing a new public work

This two-part work is called 'The Cave and The Find'. Together with Pasi Rauhala we did a permanent public work for the new school in city of Outokumpu. The work combines sculpture and video projection. It was a really interesting project and it was cool to catch some new technics from somebody working with a slightly different media. Here are some pictures from installing the work and testing the projection mappings etc. I'll post some official portfolio pictures later.

 

This was the most scary part. Lifting the heaviest piece to the highest place. Photo: Pasi Rauhala

This was the most scary part. Lifting the heaviest piece to the highest place. Photo: Pasi Rauhala

Well, that one is done.

Well, that one is done.

this second one was smaller. 

this second one was smaller. 

Testing the projection mapping in complete darkness.

Testing the projection mapping in complete darkness.

oh yes, we also installed these little pieces with triangle mirrors to get some sunlight at certain times of the day to shine some natural light. 

oh yes, we also installed these little pieces with triangle mirrors to get some sunlight at certain times of the day to shine some natural light. 

and this is artificial sunlight.

and this is artificial sunlight.

I really like this one. It's never going to be shown like this, but we were just enjoying the view.

I really like this one. It's never going to be shown like this, but we were just enjoying the view.

Model of a Tunnel in a hole in the window

It was quite fun to install my work 'Model of a Tunnel' to a little window gallery Reikä -gallery in Helsinki. The idea of the gallery is that you can only look inside from the hole in the window. You can not enter the gallery space. It was also interesting to see how the light of the day interfered with the light of the installation. At the daylight you cold only see the tunnel and after sunset you could see to the inside of the room with the moving shadows of the work.

Wrestling with new works

Yes I am working with several new works (Including two public sculptures) and experimenting with prototypes. I'm just not yet sure when I get to show these. But more new stuff is coming. Really. I'm not going to explain too much at this point, because I don' t want to spoil the surprises (and even I'm not sure about everything yet). So, I decided I'm going to share some mystery photos from now on. Here's the first. 

Some reviews of A Dying Star in Serlachius museum Gösta

New Scientist - Cosmological conceits blossom under Finland’s midnight sun
by Simon Ings

For the impatient, here's the part:

A more elegaic exploration of the same idea (that we murder to dissect) lies in Petri Eskelinen’s 2016 installationDying Star. After a few minutes, the viewer’s dark-adapted eye makes out a beautiful and convincing cloud of stars. At regular intervals, lights come on, revealing the cloud for what it is: smeared, worn Perspex sheets stuck with scraps of Post-it note and scrawled over with whiteboard pens: “Yes”; “No”; “No life field”. The night sky is reduced to a bitterly precise, tiresome, anthropocentric hunt for an earthlike planet.

The lights go out. The magic reasserts itself. To comprehend the world, we must reduce it. But as Penelope Umbrico ably reveals in 30,400,020 Suns from Sunsets from Flickr, the world is big enough to take our abuse. And in the moonlit landscapes by 19th-century artists Fanny Churberg and Hjalmar Munsterhjelm, it swallows us whole.

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Apollo Magazine - Factories, fine art and starry skies in rural Finland
by Tom Jeffreys

For the impatient, here's the part:

My personal highlight, however, is Dying Star (2016) by Petri Eskelinen. Inside a room of total darkness, we are confronted by a galaxy of tiny phosphorescent smudges. It reminds me, oddly, of the dancing colours of Georges von Swetlik’s A Woodland Pool (1933), part of the Serlachius permanent collection. As you stand and wonder about scale and distance, all of a sudden a blinding light reveals the trick: the smudges are the sums and jottings of sundry scientists seeking to identify the truths of the galaxies. In that moment, the universe is revealed to be made of maths, of information. Whether this is objective truth or subjective judgement remains open. So too does the question of whether, when it comes to theoretical physics (and art for that matter), we can ever know the difference between the two.

It has to start somehow

New and mysterious work!  hard to explain anthing else. I'll post more pics on the way.

This is how things start with a new piece. 

This is how things start with a new piece. 

Drawing bees

bees

Lately I've beeeeen entertaining myself with drawing swarms of bees. I have beeeeen researching and planning some bigger things including swarm intelligence, colony collapse disorder and finding finally the new bees. Something is going to come out of this. Bee sure! Or bee not.

Testing for a Dying Star

A testing rig, borrowed light,acrylics,wires and some special paints. Oh yeah, and some black plastic bags to cover the windows.

A testing rig, borrowed light,acrylics,wires and some special paints. Oh yeah, and some black plastic bags to cover the windows.

Started testing for a new piece. I've been lately working with some things which are still on not-yet-ready-to-reveal-state, but now I finally had some time to start testing for a piece for an actual exhibition on Serlachius museum. The piece is called A Dying Star. Kuoleva tähti in finnish.  It feels exciting to be in this phase of a new work. I'll post some new photos later, when I have some more things happening there. It's full of stars, Dave.

New year!!!

What did I do? Well, I got rid of some old junk. You can see it here how we did it. Happy new year!

That was satisfying!!! Now I have more space without this glass piece...

I also found a photo of a strange test piece which never became anything interesting, but it seems to be festive enough to earn it's place here.  Party umbrellas!!!

I'll soon post more pictures of some new upgrades to the shop and some new tests for new works. It's a new year with new beginnings.

Mechanics of Embrace getting some new friends

Thank you for the good folks at Gizmodo for doing a little piece about 'Mechanics of Embrace'. Also the gif included was quite fun.

Here's the link to Gizmodo. 

Also, as is the way of the internet, the piece got some follow ups which gave the sculpture some new meaning. Some about loneliness, sadness and love, which is all fine. My starting point for the work was about how to feel your own hands on your back, in a technical way, that you wouldn't really be touching your back, but the structure would copy the movements of your hands, like when you would do when hugging someone. I simplified the process to 3 joints for one arm. Also thematically it's continuing my full contact sculptures which I'm still working with. (New stuff is coming! ) So I had this technical start for the work, but I noticed quite quickly that it also had a certain calming effect on people. And on me. Also, after one museum exhibition, I got some really touching feedback of a father of an autistic child, a little boy who really enjoyed the use of the work and after 50 times or so, had easier to hug real people. After this I have also found the works of Temple Gradin and her squeeze chair etc. This work is a good example about what my work's can actually teach me.  

Yes, I did some googling about my work, I was curious. Here are some results.

Hug this machine to get hugged right backFastocodesign.com

When no one loves you, this terrifying wooden hugging machine will. Nymag.com

Feeling sad? Let this machine give you a great big hug. Thedailyorbit.com

This machine gives hugs, so you'll never have to Netflix and chill... bustle.com

Others seek to hug it's better to give yourself a hug (Translated from chinese). egg-life.net? Omelette life? Whatever, but this is one is quite interesting...